What’s (not) in a Name

I just blogged about What’s (not) in a Name over at the Pivotal Labs blog.

I solve design problems. Sometimes I use hi-res mockups, sometimes I use wireframes. I always use empathy. I always strive to understand the user and design against their needs.

What am I? What should I call myself?

Check it out, and let me know what you think in the comments!

Long-term Estimation in an Agile Environment, or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Assumptions Label

I just blogged about my Long-term Estimation in an Agile Environment, or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Assumptions Label over at the Pivotal Labs blog.

ESTIMATION IS HARD! Flexible plans executed via iterative development are at the core of Agile:

Welcome changing requirements, even late in development. Agile processes harness change for the customer’s competitive advantage.

This is great for figuring out what to build, but all this flexibility can make planning difficult…

Check it out, and let me know what you think in the comments!

Enforcing Sustainable Pace at the micro-level

I just blogged about Enforcing Sustainable Pace at the Micro-Level over at the Pivotal Labs blog.

Sustainable Pace is one of the Principles behind the Agile Manifesto:

Agile processes promote sustainable development.
The sponsors, developers, and users should be able to maintain a constant pace indefinitely.

For the last few years I’ve been using an app called Time Out to make sure I take regular breaks…

Check it out, and let me know what you think in the comments!

3 Challenges for Agile Design

I just blogged about my 3 Challenges for Agile Design over at the Pivotal Labs blog.

Software development has been revolutionized by Agile development practices, but designers struggle to adapt to the very same techniques—despite suffering many of the same challenges that led to Agile. What exactly are these problems? And how can Agilists and designers address them?

Check it out, and let me know what you think in the comments!

How to Build an Awesome, Affordable, Flexible Standing Desk Using Metroshelves

I just blogged about my How to Build an Awesome, Affordable, Flexible Standing Desk Using Metroshelves over at the Pivotal Labs blog.

I’ve written about using a standing desk; now let’s talk about building one. Commercial standing desks are ugly and overpriced. Building standing desks out of Metroshelves is a great alternative: economic, ergonomic, efficient in their use of space, robust, and flexible. Best of all, if you decide you no longer want a standing desk, its easy to reconfigure into shelving or a sitting desk.

Check it out, and let me know what you think in the comments!

The Big Design Refactor

I just blogged about The Big Design Refactor over at the Pivotal Labs blog.

Design starts with systematic thinking and then shifts to incremental changes. No matter where a project starts, at some point the design systems’ integrity will degrade to the point that you need to look at the whole thing fresh. Welcome to the Big Design Refactor. In the beginning, you had a beautiful, functional design system. And then you had to watch, helplessly, as it degraded under the weight of a thousand tiny changes. What can you do?

Check it out, and let me know what you think in the comments!

The Journey to Using a Standing Desk

I just blogged about my Journey to Using a Standing Desk over at the Pivotal Labs blog.

Why a standing desk? Ultimately the goal is to go to a treadmill desk (for reasons outlined here), but before sinking the money and effort into that endeavor, I’d been meaning to try out a standing desk. It was never really a priority and I was working at a client-site (which inhibited my ability to request furniture) and so I kept putting it off. Finally one day I snapped…

Check it out, and let me know what you think in the comments!